All posts tagged: USA

Frank Skinner’s Magnificent Obsession

Almost 66 years ago, on August 4, Magnificent Obsession was released. A technicolor drama romantic film directed by Douglas Sirk starring Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson. The movie was originally based on the 1929’s novel Magnificent Obsession by Lloyd C. Douglas. It was one of four of his books that were eventually made into blockbuster motion pictures, the other three being The Robe, White Banners, and The Big Fisherman. While Magnificent Obsession had had a pretty successful run at the box office, it’s important to remember Frank Skinner’s magnificent score in the movie as well. The two-part orchestral rendition is sumptuously splendid on its own and is indisputably one of the finest from the composer. Listen. Advertisements

Advertisements

Sreym Hctim – Turn Tail

Drifting through Turn Tail rings up twin feelings of bizarreness and fervency. The Brooklyn based artist tucks microcosms of formidable sounds inside each of the five irrefutable pieces in the EP – sounds that invigorated from different genres and mostly illustrate the histrionic aspect of music. From plucks of a miniature harp swimming in a distant drone to samples of screeches heard from the Jefferson platform, Turn Tail is an ornate reminder that it’s alright if you feel messed up. Sreym Mctim’s debut album in 2019, Split Ends, Split Head was a sonically tempered representation filled with complex rhythmic phrases, ardently whispered cantillation and fastidiously restrained noise. Split Ends, Split Head’s sound was immensely influenced by indie-pop music and the sound of East Asia. Its dark and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable, and refreshing. But with Turn Tail all these elements have become even rigorous. With every project Sreym has put out, there has been a distinct change in the playfulness of his sound. Each more intriguing than the last one. In Turn Tail too, …

Leya: Flood Dreams. Listen

Leya, the Brooklyn based duo of harpist Marilu Donovan and violinist Adam Markiewicz, just dropped their second full-length album Flood Dream. Their obscure combination of violin and detuned harp with a bit of influence from pre-Baroque chamber music is absolutely haunting and charming at the same time. The duo’s first album, The Fool, released in 2018, was a glimmer of ambiguous motif they have elegantly conferred on this 2020 project. Flood dream is perplexing and it stays like that even after a few listen.

Ivan Ave – Phone Won’t Charge

Ivan Ave just dropped his r&b and west coast hip hop inspired track Phone Won’t Charge right on 6th March 2020. The Norwegian artist is a master at blending in soulful keys with chill Lo-Fi drums. And this time with a touch of modern r&b, he has brought an amazing record for approaching Spring. Listen below. “The lyrics, he explains (below), were inspired by a period where he found himself cut off from the internet, an experience that ended up becoming a rewarding one.” reported Complex, that also premiered the single. Be on the lookout for his new album Double Goodbyes dropping on 24th of April this year.

Dave Brubeck: In Your Own Sweet Way

In Your Own Sweet Way was written around 1952, published in 1955 and later released on July 16, 1956, on Brubeck Plays Brubeck. The same year Miles Davis recorded the standard twice — once in March with Sonny Rollins as the quintet’s saxophonist, and in May with John Coltrane and released it on his 1959’s album – Workin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet. In 1960, Wes Montgomery covered and featured the standard as the 6th track on his fourth album The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery. Later in 1963, Clare Fischer recorded a solo piano version which was then featured on his album Easy Livin’ released in 1966 as a limited edition and reissued in 1968 again. Bill Evans also included the standard on the live album Time Remembered’s 1999 cd track list. Many other artists have covered the jazz standard since its publication. Listen.

The Peak – Bill Evans & Jim Hall – Skating In Central Park

Skating In Central Park was originally written by John Lewis for Odds Against Tomorrow, a 1959’s film produced and directed by Robert Wise. The Modern Jazz Quartet recorded the tune for the film and for their album Music from Odds Against Tomorrow and released it in 1959 on United Artists Record. Bill Evans and Jim Hall re-record the waltz and released it on their 1962 album Undercurrent on United Artists, which Jazz critic Pete Welding stated: “This collaboration between Evans and Hall has resulted in some of the most beautiful, thoroughly ingratiating music it has been my pleasure to hear—now or any other time.” The album cover for Undercurrent is originally Toni Frissell’s photograph Weeki Wachee Spring, Florida.