All posts filed under: Reviews

Sreym Hctim – Turn Tail

Drifting through Turn Tail rings up twin feelings of bizarreness and fervency. The Brooklyn based artist tucks microcosms of formidable sounds inside each of the five irrefutable pieces in the EP – sounds that invigorated from different genres and mostly illustrate the histrionic aspect of music. From plucks of a miniature harp swimming in a distant drone to samples of screeches heard from the Jefferson platform, Turn Tail is an ornate reminder that it’s alright if you feel messed up. Sreym Mctim’s debut album in 2019, Split Ends, Split Head was a sonically tempered representation filled with complex rhythmic phrases, ardently whispered cantillation and fastidiously restrained noise. Split Ends, Split Head’s sound was immensely influenced by indie-pop music and the sound of East Asia. Its dark and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable, and refreshing. But with Turn Tail all these elements have become even rigorous. With every project Sreym has put out, there has been a distinct change in the playfulness of his sound. Each more intriguing than the last one. In Turn Tail too, …

Sufjan Stevens – Carrie and Lowell

Thanks to the cold, plain and nifty autumn evening of an ordinary Thursday. This album was almost slipping by if I hadn’t decided to collect as many indie-folk albums as I possibly could back in 2015. Sufjan Stevens is a Detroit born singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and at this point of his career, it’s safe to say that he is an international treasure. Carrie and Lowell is Sufjan Stevens 7th studio album released through Asthmatic Kitty on March 31, 2015, named after his mother and stepfather. The album is a tale of the relationship that he had with his mother and the blocks of feelings that he went through after her death. The album received massively positive reviews from the critics and was considered one of the best albums released in 2015. Carrie and Lowell is Sufjan’s personal album. The lyrics in the album are the projection of him being stuck in the intricacies of emotions and thoughts that he felt after the death of his mother. Carrie was bipolar and schizophrenic. She was an alcoholic and …

Disclosure: Ecstasy

Over the years, Disclosure is whiting down their music. It’s been almost five years since the duo has dropped Caracal, their last full-length LP. But they did not, however, abandon their fans entirely. The duo has released three EPs since Caracal, one of which just dropped last week, titled Ecstasy. A five-song long EP includes Tondo, Expressing What Matters, Etran, Get Close and the title track. Disclosure came out with their four-to-the-floor debut, Settle, during when dance music was growing its mainstream prominence. It was one of the best electronic albums of 2013 with blend-in elements from dance-pop, bass music, deep house, and UK & Future garage. Settle’s crispy and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable and refreshing, much like UK’s dance music scene that always pushes itself forward. But their follow up project, 2015’s r&b driven Caracal was a bit of a disappointment. The album lost its prominence into the noise of heavy names like The Weeknd, Sam Smith, Lorde, and Miguel and chart-friendly sound. But it is what it is. The duo’s funky-as-fuck sound …

KURO (OST) – Tujiko Noriko

Listening to the soundtrack of 2017’s feature from Joji Koyama and Tujiko Noriko’s is an ornate experience of serene dissemination that breathes on its own. You don’t necessarily have to watch the movie to find out its haunting elegance and understated rumination. Kuro, an arthouse drama, tells the story of a Japanese woman living in Paris with her paraplegic lover. Soon, the mystery unravels. Weaving together personal history, anecdotes and myths, the story takes a dark turn. Thanks to Berlin’s Pan, whose new offshoot and soundtrack series, Entopia, kicked off its inaugural release with Kuro in May 2019. Kuro’s score, written and composed by Tujiko Noriko, who is also the protagonist of the movie, and mixed by Sam Briton and Will Worsley, is a milieu full of doubt and chimerical essence. It’s a stoic and unruffled ambient experience that feeds off incoherent and stretched melody riffs and humming condensed into a small space avoiding all the oscillation. The last time Noriko put out a project, it was hard to know what would come next to that. But …

Rabbit Island – Deep in The Big

The troublesome thing about being a musician who writes records similar to Amber Fresh and her friends is that it’s a hard process to decide when to let go and just release a project because the tracks are mostly Lo-Fi and damped or in other words filled with distortion, noises, and reverb that sometimes make the record only less interesting. A reason why most of the bedroom producers who make Lo-Fi music don’t release their tracks and they just end up being a part of live radios or continuous mixes on YouTube. When Rabbit Island posted Songs for Kids from Rabbit Island back in January 2014 on Bandcamp it was distinct, belonging somewhere in between Frankie Cosmos’s why am I underwater?, DADDY COOL, im sorry im hi lets go, pure suburb and Benoît Pioulard’s Hymnal or even the King Creosote and Jon Hopkins’s collaborative project Diamond Mine from 2011. The whole project was analogous to watching our childhood through an 8mm Kodak camera in the early 90s; innocent, honest, pure and mostly heartwarming. The 16 tracks album …