All posts filed under: Recent

Sreym Hctim – Turn Tail

Drifting through Turn Tail rings up twin feelings of bizarreness and fervency. The Brooklyn based artist tucks microcosms of formidable sounds inside each of the five irrefutable pieces in the EP – sounds that invigorated from different genres and mostly illustrate the histrionic aspect of music. From plucks of a miniature harp swimming in a distant drone to samples of screeches heard from the Jefferson platform, Turn Tail is an ornate reminder that it’s alright if you feel messed up. Sreym Mctim’s debut album in 2019, Split Ends, Split Head was a sonically tempered representation filled with complex rhythmic phrases, ardently whispered cantillation and fastidiously restrained noise. Split Ends, Split Head’s sound was immensely influenced by indie-pop music and the sound of East Asia. Its dark and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable, and refreshing. But with Turn Tail all these elements have become even rigorous. With every project Sreym has put out, there has been a distinct change in the playfulness of his sound. Each more intriguing than the last one. In Turn Tail too, …

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Watch Lorn’s Timesink

Illinois’ Marcos Ortega, better known by his stage name Lorn just dropped a video for the track Timesink from his niche experimental 7th full-length LP Drown The Traitor Within. The video features a caption that says, “Shot in Fall of 2019 pre COVID-19. We hope you all stay safe, and spend this time with your loved ones in the midst of this global pandemic.” The Pavel Brenner directed music video shows a lone boy riding a bike through a deserted and eerily peaceful forest road. He dodges a range of abandoned vehicles and a roadblock where nature is reasserting itself after a widespread disease that wiped out humanity. The video ends with him coming across two elks. His right eye bleeds but he continues to cycle through the road. Watch.

Poemme – Blooming Spring

Underappreciated and undiscovered findings are the biggest offering of the streaming era. As we enter unflinchingly into the canton of Spring, Poemme’s Blooming Spring can be one of those spiffy findings. The 27-minute-long buoyant ambient project filled with glinting airs, water and birdsong is calm and both melancholic and ecstatic. From the Morning Sun’s otherworldly glimmer to Evening Wind’s arcane coruscation, Blooming Spring offers nothing but a gradual drone and minimalist masterpieces. Listen.

Stones Throw Releases Mndsgn & Sofie’s Abeja

Los Angeles label Stones Throw just released Mndsgn & Sofie’s Abeja as a single from Sofie Fatouretchi’s (one of the original crew of Boiler Room) compilation album Sofie’s SOS Tape from 2016. It featured 24 tracks from 26 artists like Illingsworth, DJ Harrison, Stimulator Jones, Ahwlee, Cavalier, MndSgn, Sofie and many others. The album was an insider look on emerging acts across the US and abroad with an album cover designed by Argentinian-based artist Gustavo Eandi. SOS Tape served the purpose to showcase “underground’s best hip-hop and soul” that otherwise would have stayed floating in DJ sets and personal mixtapes on Sofie’s monthly show on London-based radio station NTS Radio. Listen.

Ivan Ave – Phone Won’t Charge

Ivan Ave just dropped his r&b and west coast hip hop inspired track Phone Won’t Charge right on 6th March 2020. The Norwegian artist is a master at blending in soulful keys with chill Lo-Fi drums. And this time with a touch of modern r&b, he has brought an amazing record for approaching Spring. Listen below. “The lyrics, he explains (below), were inspired by a period where he found himself cut off from the internet, an experience that ended up becoming a rewarding one.” reported Complex, that also premiered the single. Be on the lookout for his new album Double Goodbyes dropping on 24th of April this year.

Disclosure: Ecstasy

Over the years, Disclosure is whiting down their music. It’s been almost five years since the duo has dropped Caracal, their last full-length LP. But they did not, however, abandon their fans entirely. The duo has released three EPs since Caracal, one of which just dropped last week, titled Ecstasy. A five-song long EP includes Tondo, Expressing What Matters, Etran, Get Close and the title track. Disclosure came out with their four-to-the-floor debut, Settle, during when dance music was growing its mainstream prominence. It was one of the best electronic albums of 2013 with blend-in elements from dance-pop, bass music, deep house, and UK & Future garage. Settle’s crispy and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable and refreshing, much like UK’s dance music scene that always pushes itself forward. But their follow up project, 2015’s r&b driven Caracal was a bit of a disappointment. The album lost its prominence into the noise of heavy names like The Weeknd, Sam Smith, Lorde, and Miguel and chart-friendly sound. But it is what it is. The duo’s funky-as-fuck sound …

KURO (OST) – Tujiko Noriko

Listening to the soundtrack of 2017’s feature from Joji Koyama and Tujiko Noriko’s is an ornate experience of serene dissemination that breathes on its own. You don’t necessarily have to watch the movie to find out its haunting elegance and understated rumination. Kuro, an arthouse drama, tells the story of a Japanese woman living in Paris with her paraplegic lover. Soon, the mystery unravels. Weaving together personal history, anecdotes and myths, the story takes a dark turn. Thanks to Berlin’s Pan, whose new offshoot and soundtrack series, Entopia, kicked off its inaugural release with Kuro in May 2019. Kuro’s score, written and composed by Tujiko Noriko, who is also the protagonist of the movie, and mixed by Sam Briton and Will Worsley, is a milieu full of doubt and chimerical essence. It’s a stoic and unruffled ambient experience that feeds off incoherent and stretched melody riffs and humming condensed into a small space avoiding all the oscillation. The last time Noriko put out a project, it was hard to know what would come next to that. But …

Rabbit Island – Deep in The Big

The troublesome thing about being a musician who writes records similar to Amber Fresh and her friends is that it’s a hard process to decide when to let go and just release a project because the tracks are mostly Lo-Fi and damped or in other words filled with distortion, noises, and reverb that sometimes make the record only less interesting. A reason why most of the bedroom producers who make Lo-Fi music don’t release their tracks and they just end up being a part of live radios or continuous mixes on YouTube. When Rabbit Island posted Songs for Kids from Rabbit Island back in January 2014 on Bandcamp it was distinct, belonging somewhere in between Frankie Cosmos’s why am I underwater?, DADDY COOL, im sorry im hi lets go, pure suburb and Benoît Pioulard’s Hymnal or even the King Creosote and Jon Hopkins’s collaborative project Diamond Mine from 2011. The whole project was analogous to watching our childhood through an 8mm Kodak camera in the early 90s; innocent, honest, pure and mostly heartwarming. The 16 tracks album …

A Soundtrack Worth Remembering – Le Mariage Collectif

If you type in Le Mariage Collectif or Collective Marriage on Google, it’s definitely unlike most of the search results you would get for a movie. There’s not much out there on the Internet about it that might be of your interest. Mariage Collectif has been anything but remembered by history as an important movie, that’s for sure, a fact even admitted by the press release for its soundtrack. A 1971 French drama based upon a married couple having difficulties in a sexual relationship. Sounds lame, right? Well, not everything about this movie is as lame as you think it might be. Conversely, Mariage Collectif could be taken as a minor classic as well. But what has really been noteworthy and significant about it is the soundtrack from Jean-Pierre Mirouze and the story behind the recovery of the album. Even though, Mariage Collectif’s soundtrack is considered one of the most fascinating soundtrack out there and has influenced many sounds of 21st century, the album was once long forgotten and had been conserved through only a handful …

I Trawl The Megahertz

I said ‘Your daddy loves you.’ I said ‘Your daddy loves you very much…He just doesn’t want to live with us anymore.’ It’s been a good one year since Prefab Sprout reissued I Trawl the Megahertz. But its original release eventuated way back. Almost 17 years. Hovering around the Internet to find the reviews of the album, three results pop up as the most relevant. One of which by Chris Jones at BBC has now been archived (Archivng is primarily a process of collecting portions of the world wide web to ensure the information is safe and preserved in an archive for future researchers, historians, and the public.) and is no longer updated, even after the reissue, another one by Guy Collier at thedigitalfix, looks old and an in-depth review by Sam Sodomsky at Pitchfork published on March 23, 2019 after the reissue. All of which found their commonground in agreeing the novelty of the project. I Trawl The Megahertz is a beautiful musical ecstasy, originally released as a Paddy McAloon solo project in May 2003, but one must also understand …