Author: Bony

Revisiting Vaporwave In 2020

Almost 10 years ago, vaporwave memes took over the internet by storm. The first microgenre to be born and live its life entirely on the Internet. Thanks to its nostalgic and surrealist take on popular culture and entertainment that helped exteriorized the bygone-ingenuousness. But writing about Vaporwave in 2020 is almost as unnecessary as carrying small changes for the phone booths. We don’t need to do that anymore because there are plenty of other things out there to do and talk about in 2020. Not that consumer capitalism is dead, it’s just we are trying to be satisfied with the status quo we are in right now. If everything I am saying sounds confusing to you, try this. Or this.. Vaporwave was originally created as a meme with an ambiguous and satirical take on globalization, runaway consumerism, manufactured nostalgia, and most importantly technoculture (the interactions between, and politics of, technology and culture). No other music has ever been directly associated with these aspects of the zeitgeist. And if it was the first time you heard …

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Anubhavam – Bombay Jayashri

It was at this year’s Dover Lane Music Conference where Vidushi Bombay Jayashri’s (Ramnath) elegance was incomparable. She came, she performed for almost an hour and a half and left. She didn’t talk much. But it was her singing and improvisations that did most of the talking for her through the Carnatic music. If it was not for the management of the Dover lane Conference, she would have stayed and performed a little longer. It was apparent that the audience wanted more of her voice. This performance was a little confounding, quite soothing and mostly enthralling. The soulful kritis and tillana that she performed were downright delightful and fascinating. She is an Academy Award nominee for best original song after all. For someone coming from India, it sounds invigorating. Mostly to the people pursuing the same route of music she leads. Jayashri has sung for multiple movies, one of which the Life of Pi has led her to the nominee for best original score, but it’s mostly her classical performance that’s her hybrid offering. “The …

Disclosure: Ecstasy

Over the years, Disclosure is whiting down their music. It’s been almost five years since the duo has dropped Caracal, their last full-length LP. But they did not, however, abandon their fans entirely. The duo has released three EPs since Caracal, one of which just dropped last week, titled Ecstasy. A five-song long EP includes Tondo, Expressing What Matters, Etran, Get Close and the title track. Disclosure came out with their four-to-the-floor debut, Settle, during when dance music was growing its mainstream prominence. It was one of the best electronic albums of 2013 with blend-in elements from dance-pop, bass music, deep house, and UK & Future garage. Settle’s crispy and coquettish persona was playful, enjoyable and refreshing, much like UK’s dance music scene that always pushes itself forward. But their follow up project, 2015’s r&b driven Caracal was a bit of a disappointment. The album lost its prominence into the noise of heavy names like The Weeknd, Sam Smith, Lorde, and Miguel and chart-friendly sound. But it is what it is. The duo’s funky-as-fuck sound …

Frank & Nancy Sinatra: Somethin’ Stupid

Frank Sinatra’s most celebrated collaboration of the 60s wasn’t with an orchestra or a luminary songwriter, but with his daughter, Nancy Sinatra. The song Somethin’ stupid had first appeared a year before the Sinatras shared their love for singing with each other. It was originally a duet between C. Carson Parks and his wife, Gaile Foote, written by Parks himself. Somethin’ Stupid tells a story about a man and a woman enjoying each other’s company until one of them spoils that by saying Somethin’ Stupid….”And then I go and spoil it all by saying somethin’ stupid like, ‘I love you’” the chorus sings. The track was issued in 1967 as a single and later appeared on Frank Sinatra’s 1967 album The World We Knew. Frank and Nancy’s version keeps the basic arrangement of the original, but while Parks and Foote’s vocals are well complementary to each other, the Sinatras’ were a bit harsh on the surface, pushing Nancy Sinatra’s voice under Frank Sintra‘s. Somethin’ Stupid was nominated for the Record Of The Year at the 10th Grammy Awards, losing …